1st Silicon to set up office in Europe
The Borneo Post- Thursday, 19 December 2002
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KUCHING: Malaysia's first foundry, 1st Silicon (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd will be setting up an office in Europe next year to penetrate the European market.

Chief executive officer John Nelson said this would be the next step for 1st Silicon as they strived to widen their business rather than just focusing on their current clients, namely Japan, USA and Taiwan.

However, the enterprise was currently concentrating on Korea first as the next target market for its wafers, he said.

"I am going to Korea next week," he told reporters at the lst Silicon (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd's Hari Raya Aidil Fitri and Christmas gathering at Holiday Inn Hotel here on Tuesday night.

He said the industry was still in recession but was confident that it will grow substantially over the next couple of years.

"We have many on-going discussions with customers," he said, hopeful that the outcome would be fruitful despite that the industry was one that was highly price competitive.

Nelson believed that there would be significant growth in the sector in 2004 and that 1st Silicon would continue to shrewdly invest step-by-step and adding new equipment if and when necessary.

"It is an expensive industry," he said, adding that the expenditure for the company had to be carefully planned to ensure maximum usage and profitability.

He said many people had a misconception on the production of wafers. "It takes about nine months from the meeting of clients to the delivery of the products," he said, adding that it took about 45 days to produce the final wafer product.

And if there were any interruption at any one stage of producing the wafer, it would disrupt the whole production process, he said. "So we have to basically strive for nothing short of perfection," he said.

He also pointed out that the support of the Sarawak government had been excellent and that the State and nation had well-established infrastructure, the technology and the equipment in place.

There were changes happening in the company and industry, however, those involved were evolving with these changes, he said.

On the local workforce, Nelson said there was undoubtedly talented employees who would eventually be trained to be the management of 1st Silicon.

"Today we have a lot of expatriates, but in the future, the locals will play a dominant role," he said.1st Silicon to set up office in Europe

KUCHING: Malaysia's first foundry, 1st Silicon (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd will be setting up an office in Europe next year to penetrate the European market.

Chief executive officer John Nelson said this would be the next step for 1st Silicon as they strived to widen their business rather than just focusing on their current clients, namely Japan, USA and Taiwan.

However, the enterprise was currently concentrating on Korea first as the next target market for its wafers, he said.

"I am going to Korea next week," he told reporters at the lst Silicon (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd's Hari Raya Aidil Fitri and Christmas gathering at Holiday Inn Hotel here on Tuesday night.

He said the industry was still in recession but was confident that it will grow substantially over the next couple of years.

"We have many on-going discussions with customers," he said, hopeful that the outcome would be fruitful despite that the industry was one that was highly price competitive.

Nelson believed that there would be significant growth in the sector in 2004 and that 1st Silicon would continue to shrewdly invest step-by-step and adding new equipment if and when necessary.

"It is an expensive industry," he said, adding that the expenditure for the company had to be carefully planned to ensure maximum usage and profitability.

He said many people had a misconception on the production of wafers. "It takes about nine months from the meeting of clients to the delivery of the products," he said, adding that it took about 45 days to produce the final wafer product.

And if there were any interruption at any one stage of producing the wafer, it would disrupt the whole production process, he said. "So we have to basically strive for nothing short of perfection," he said.

He also pointed out that the support of the Sarawak government had been excellent and that the State and nation had well-established infrastructure, the technology and the equipment in place.

There were changes happening in the company and industry, however, those involved were evolving with these changes, he said.

On the local workforce, Nelson said there was undoubtedly talented employees who would eventually be trained to be the management of 1st Silicon.

"Today we have a lot of expatriates, but in the future, the locals will play a dominant role," he said.